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Thread: Ripping Blu-Ray with AnyDVD HD

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default Ripping Blu-Ray with AnyDVD HD

    Hello all. I have successfully ripped a blu-ray with AnyDVD HD. I ripped it to my hard drive.

    However most of these rips are anywhere from 30 to 50 GB and too large for a 25GB single layer BD-R.

    I suppose slysoft hasn't made a Clone DVD equivalent for Blu-Ray movies yet... so my question is how I do resize these "rips" in order to make them fit on a 25GB single layer BD-R ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    147

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    Quote Originally Posted by WOWchamp View Post
    Hello all. I have successfully ripped a blu-ray with AnyDVD HD. I ripped it to my hard drive.

    However most of these rips are anywhere from 30 to 50 GB and too large for a 25GB single layer BD-R.

    I suppose slysoft hasn't made a Clone DVD equivalent for Blu-Ray movies yet... so my question is how I do resize these "rips" in order to make them fit on a 25GB single layer BD-R ?
    Until Slysoft releases CloneBD (or whatever they will name it) I would suggest ripping to an ISO with AnyDVD HD - and then using BD Rebuilder to shrink it down to fit on a 25Gb blank BD disk and burn it with ImgBurn - works for me without issue

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    So far this is working great! Thanks a bunch.

    I will say that making copies of a blu-ray disk is such a pain that they really could have done without protecting the disks. If I had known it was such a tedious process I would have waited on buying the blu-ray burner.


    To add to that I have a very fast computer, what I would say is in the top 10% of what the home user would have and it took a good while for BD Rebuild to reize my blu-ray rip. I haven't got home to check the log yet but it was only at 1% after a minuet.

    Computer specs:

    Intel Core i7 930 (LGA 1366 quad core) @ stock speeds
    ASROCK X58 extreme motherboard
    6GB (3X2 GB) of G.Skill DDR3 1600 memory
    LG BLACK WH10LS30 10X Blu-Ray burner
    Samsung CD/DVD burner SH-S223C
    Western Digital caviar blue 640GB HDD WD6400AAKS
    HIS Turbo Radeon 5870 Cypress XT 1GB GDDR5 256 bit


    Doing blu-ray work on this machine is fast compared to the norm but its not what I consider "fast". Running Tsmuxer on a file takes about 7 to 8 min.

    This can also decode 1080p video and stream it to my PS3 while using less then 15% of the processor in my computer.


    I really await CloneBD !

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Encoding into good quality H264 always takes time as it uses a lot of CPU power to compress it. If you get it to 1% in 1 minute then you must be using standard settings. I use 2 pass encodes (what they call default even though it doesn't default to it as standard)and they take a lot longer than real time on a i7 950cpu. It also depends on what it's converting from.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    147

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    Quote Originally Posted by WOWchamp View Post
    To add to that I have a very fast computer, what I would say is in the top 10% of what the home user would have and it took a good while for BD Rebuild to reize my blu-ray rip. I haven't got home to check the log yet but it was only at 1% after a minuet.
    Yah - I guess I forgot to warn you about the time it takes BD RB to shrink a BD - but just imagine how much longer it might take if you didn't have the i7 PC you are using

    I've also got an i7 powerhouse desktop loaded/spec'd to the point of overkill -- but I actually stopped shrinking and burning all BDs and DVDs -- I just rip them to a file/container and play them all from the rip

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Lancaster, PA
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    Even cloneBD, when it becomes a reality, won't really speed up the process much, it's just the large amount of data that is being processed that takes time. I'm running a 3 year old Q6600 processor, 680I motherboard, 6GB, and multiple hard drives in my PC, and the total process of ripping, muxing, reauthoring, and burning takes me about 2 hours to complete a single BD. And I'm not even doing any compression - if the movie is over 24 GB, I will split it with tsmuxer at a chapter point into two m2ts files and burn to 2 discs, basically the same way I've been doing DVDs for the last 4 years. So, tack on another half hour or so for a 2-disc movie. Gets to be tedious and boring, fotunately I have a second computer next to my burning PC to browse the web with while it's doing its thing...

  7. #7
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    Jun 2007
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    I have a q6600 as well as my second machine, I just leave it encoding overnight and it's usually ready by the morning

  8. #8
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    Sep 2008
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    Lancaster, PA
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    Well, even a very large movie like Avatar ripped to the hard drive on my PC in just slightly over an hour... all the other steps muxing, re-authoring and burning run between 10 and 20 minutes max. What takes up the moxt time making a backup is walking away from the PC and forgetting to go back to it for an hour or two to perform the next step, lol...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    7

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    I have Fox Studio Movie there was a start up file in jar folder I edit with notepad change player update card start the main title of move and doing that made easier older blu-ray software run dvd and don't use java when skipping chapters and still have all the audio and subtitles.
    Last edited by flying; 8th October 2010 at 11:31. Reason: miss type some stuff

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